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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

1 edition of Determining cleanup goals at radioactively contaminated sites found in the catalog.

Determining cleanup goals at radioactively contaminated sites

Determining cleanup goals at radioactively contaminated sites

case studies

  • 328 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Radionuclides Team in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactive decontamination -- Planning.,
  • Radioactive decontamination -- Management.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Radionuclides Team.
    SeriesCase study / Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Case study (Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council)
    ContributionsInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council. Radionuclides Team.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTK9152.2 .D48 2002
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[102] p. :
    Number of Pages102
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3705377M
    LC Control Number2003274021
    OCLC/WorldCa50053579

    Since most radioactively contaminated DOE and DOD sites are developing cleanup goals under CERCLA authority, there is a need for a training course that clarifies the variations between these approaches and elaborates on the methodology used to develop risk-based remediation goals. contaminated sites should achieve risks to human health consistent with risks that could result from permitted disposals of low-level radioactive waste at any DOE site, the proposed radiological criteria for determining acceptable remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites .

    buildings at the site. The EPA document “Remediating Goals for Radioactively Contaminated CERCLA Sites Using the Benchmark Dose Cleanup Criterion 10 CFR Part 40 Appendix A, I, Criterion 6(6)” provides guidance regarding how Criterion 6(6) should be implemented as an ARAR at Superfund sites, including using a radium soil cleanup level of.   The collective process of safely shutting down, dismantling, cleaning up, reclaiming, and monitoring nuclear facilities is collectively known as nuclear decommissioning. Nuclear power has been used as a source of energy for more than 50 years, and more than nuclear reactors have been constructed and operated worldwide [ 1 ].

    remediation and the need to achieve negotiated agreements among regulators, site managers, and stakeholders, rather than rigid adherence to dose or risk criteria in regulations. • State governments have a vital role in determining accept-able remediation of radioactively contaminated sites, including sites licensed by NRC, and the role of the. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF.


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Determining cleanup goals at radioactively contaminated sites Download PDF EPUB FB2

ITRC – Determining Cleanup Goals at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies April nonpower research, test, and training reactors; fuel cycle facilities; medical, academic, and industrial uses of nuclear materials; and the transport, storage, and disposal of nuclear materials and waste.

Get this from a library. Determining cleanup goals at radioactively contaminated sites: case studies. [Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. Radionuclides Team.;]. Remediation strategies for contaminated sites are provided. Readers who will find this book useful include professionals specializing in radioecology, safe disposal of radioactive waste, as well as decontamination, remediation legacies and impact of.

Radioactive waste management and contaminated site clean-up is a comprehensive resource for professionals, researchers, scientists and academics in radioactive waste management, governmental and other regulatory bodies and the nuclear power industry.

He has over 35 years experience cleaning up radioactively contaminated sites in 17 states. John was an ITRC team member for Determining Cleanup Goals at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies (), and since has been a team leader for Remediation Management of Complex : Elisabeth Hawley.

The Technology Reference Guidance for Radioactively Contaminated Media (Guide) is intended to aid in the selection of treatment technologies for remediation of radioactively contaminated media.

The Guide is designed to help site managers, Remedial Program Managers (RPM), On-SceneFile Size: 1MB. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. APR 1 1 OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Directive no.

P MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Remediation Goals for Radioactively Contaminated CERCLA Sites Using the Benchmark Dose Cleanup Criteria in 10 CFR Part 40 Appendix A, I. Typically contamination is distributed from to m deep with the maximum up to m. The decontamination plan has been developed and certified.

During the period – MosSIA “Radon” decontaminated, treated and delivered for long-term storage more than m3 of the radioactive wastes. CERCLA Cleanup Levels ARARs often determine cleanup levels Where ARARs are not available or protective, EPA sets site-specific cleanup levels that» For carcinogens, represent an increased cancer risk of 1 x to 1 x — used as “point of departure” —PRGs are established at 1 x File Size: 1MB.

Over the past decade, a number of remediation techniques have been developed worldwide to deal with the environmental clean-up of radioactively contaminated sites.

These techniques vary in terms of sophistication and costs and must be selected on a case-by-case by: 1.

Approaches To Risk Management In Remediation Of Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements : Issued Octo (Ncrp R | National Council on Radiation Protection | download | B–OK.

Download books for free. Find books. This TECDOC provides general information on the characterization of radioactively contaminated sites for remediation purposes. Thus, it presents technical approaches (e.g. strategies, planning, sampling, radiation measurements, laboratory testing, etc.) used to determine.

Technologies for Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites If you would like to learn more about the IAEA’s work, sign up for our weekly updates containing our most important news, multimedia and more.

The chapter aims to summarize different remediation approaches of radionuclide pollutants in water and soil media carried out after decommissioning of nuclear installations worldwide. contamination as part of a remedy for a radioactively contaminated CERCLA remedial site. This guidance is intended to help health physicists, risk assessors, remedial project managers, and others involved with risk assessment and decision making at CERCLA remedial sites with radioactive contamination.

BackgroundFile Size: 2MB. In response, EPA issued guidance entitled "Establishment of Cleanup Levels for CERCLA Sites with Radioactive Contamination" (OSWER No.Aug ). This guidance provided clarification for establishing protective cleanup levels for radioactive contamination at CERCLA sites.

Determining Cleanup Goals at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies. Summaries of the various regulatory standards and requirements that dictate cleanup at radioactively contaminated sites, discussion of processes used to develop cleanup levels, and case studies from 12 selected sites to demonstrate variations in the decision-making.

The ITRC Radionuclides Team’s “Determining Cleanup Goals at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies” (RAD-2, April ) examines the factors influencing variations in cleanup level development at various radioactively contaminated sites and underscores the need for training to enhance consistency in.

Contaminated site boundaries and clean-up goals are often based on whether concentrations are above or below applicable regulatory/criteria levels, which vary within and between nations and depend on the end-points of concern.

Examples of criteria concentrations are provided in the Supporting Information (SI).Author: Chris S. Eckley, Cynthia C Gilmour, Sarah E. Janssen, Todd P Luxton, Paul M Randall, Lindsay Whalin. Applicability of Monitored Natural Attenuation at Radioactively Contaminated Sites If you would like to learn more about the IAEA’s work, sign up for our weekly updates containing our most important news, multimedia and more.

Since most radioactively contaminated DOE and DOD sites are developing cleanup goals under CERCLA authority, there is a need for training that clarifies the variations between these approaches and elaborates on the methodology used to develop risk-based remediation goals.The Report discusses the importance of involving state regulators and the public in establishing goals for the decontamination of radioactively contaminated sites.

Since Superfund applies to contamination by both radioactive materials and chemicals, EPA’s risk management approach uses cancer risk rather than dose, and this leads to some.Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe Volume 2: Planning for environmental restoration of contaminated sites Proceedings of a workshop held within the Technical Co-operation Project on Environmental Restoration in Central and Eastern Europe in Piestany, Slovakia, April